Resources

RESOURCES FOR WOMEN VETS

http://maketheconnection.net/

http://www.veteranswatchdog.com/2011/07/why-doesnt-va-tell-vets-about-their.html

Center for Women Veterans: Department of Veterans Affairs
Phone: 202-273-6193
Web: http://www1.va.gov/womenvet/
Provides programs and services for women veterans

Department of Defense’s Family Advocacy Program
Web: http://www.defenselink.mil/fapmip/
Locations across the United States providing services to military families dealing with family violence. You can find a program near you on the FAP’s website by selecting Family Advocacy Program.

Military HOMEFRONT
Web: http://www.militaryhomefront.dod.mil/tf/domesticabus
The Department of Defense’s webpage for victims of domestic violence who are serving or are in a relationship with someone serving in the military. The page provides basic information about the Family Advocacy Program, child abuse, domestic abuse, and resources for military families experiencing domestic abuse.

Military OneSource
Phone: (800)-342-9647
Web: http://www.militaryonesource.com/
Provides help finding a victim advocate in your area.

National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence
Phone: (512) 407-9020
Web: http://www.ncdsv.org
The National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence designs, provides, and customizes training and consultation; influences policy; promotes collaboration; and enhances diversity with the goal of ending domestic and sexual violence. This organization sponsors national and regional conferences and co-chairs the U.S. Department of Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence (DTFDV). Provides military specific information for victims of domestic violence.

National Military Family Association
2500 North Van Dorn St.. Suite 102
Alexandria VA, 22302-1601
Phone: (800) 260-0218
Web: http://www.nmfa.org/site/PageServer
The National Military Family Association (NMFA) was created by wives and widows of military personnel who were seeking financial security. NMFA programs educate military families, the public, and Congress on the rights and benefits of military families.

National Women’s Trauma Recovery Program
Phone: (650) 493-5000
Web: http://www.womenvetsptsd.va.gov/wtrp.asp
Treatment program to assist veteran women suffering from post traumatic stress disorder and/or military sexual trauma.

Service Women’s Action Network
123 Williams Street, 16th Floor
NY NY, 10038
Phone: 646-602-5621
Web: http://www.servicewomen.org/
Email: [email protected]
Offers personal support and guidance to female service members and veterans from fellow women veterans and provides pro bono legal referrals from military law experts.

Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office: The U.S. Department of Defense
Phone: (703) 696-9422
Web:http://www.sapr.mil/HomePage.aspx?Topic=Home
Email: [email protected]

Addiction Center is an online hub with information on various chemical dependencies. The site caters to veterans and non-veterans who are in search for help and are ready to make a commitment to take control of their lives.
Phone: (877) 655-5116
Website: https://www.addictioncenter.com/addiction/veterans/

National Call Center for Homeless Veterans: 1-877-424-3838
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (Veterans Press “1″)
National Veterans Chat Line:
www.SuicidePreventionLifeline.org

U.S. VETS: United States Veterans Initiative

U.S. VETS offers many programs and services to veterans, including transitional and affordable housing, job training, career centers, mental health services and counseling. The organization’s Advance Women’s Program is designed to help women veterans with military sexual trauma, health issues and psychological barriers.

Walter Reed Army Medical Center

Help a veteran get the treatment she needs to start rebuilding her life. Walter Reed provides care to past, present and future soldiers who need care.

The Army Wounded Soldier and Family Hotline: 1-800-984-8523

Grace After Fire

Dedicated to female veterans, Grace After Fire is a place to connect with other women service members and their families. Also, veterans can submit questions to fellow veterans.

Wounded Warrior Project

In this organization, injured service members get together to support each other and raise awareness about public aid. Wounded soldiers can get benefits counseling, peer mentoring and more. The Wounded Warrior Project also offers programs and services for veterans’ loved ones.

Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America

This organization is the nation’s first—and largest—group dedicated to the veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and their supporters. IAVA teaches veterans how to play a role in the community, connect with others, organize fundraisers and stay informed on issues that are affecting veterans.

American Women Veterans Foundation

Dedicated to preserving and promoting the legacy of servicewomen, veterans and their families, American Women Veterans is a good resource for veterans looking for retreats, conferences and outreach campaigns that empower members and their communities. Female servicemembers are also encouraged to continue helping out in their communities and the nation through philanthropy.

Veterans of Foreign Wars

The Veterans of Foreign Wars strive to do good things for veterans, their families and their communities. This organization offers assistance through the National Veterans Service, transitioning back into society, troop support programs, post-military help and programs for veterans’ family members.


Military, Veterans & Patriotic Service Organizations of America (MVPSOA)

This organization certifies high-quality national nonprofits that help veterans and their families. MVPSOA provides information about scholarships for the children of military personnel and information on funding memorials and museums that honor those who have served our country.

The National Archives: Sources for Veterans Information, Aid and Benefits

This website offers a robust list of government services, including resources for a veteran’s specific military branch. Plus, veterans can find out about government assistance in their communities.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration offers information about suicide prevention, addiction and trauma. Veterans can also learn to cope with fear and anxiety and deal with grief.

U.S. Office of Personal Management’s Government-Wide Veterans Employment

On November 9, 2009, President Barack Obama signed Executive Order 13518, Employment of Veterans in the Federal Government, which established the Veterans Employment Initiative. This website is the result. It’s helpful for veterans who are looking for a job because it helps the government recruit and employ U.S. veterans.

Student Veterans of America

This organization ensures that veterans are successful in their transition from combat to the classroom by helping them develop student veteran groups on college campuses across the United States. Also, veterans can support fellow student veterans here.

The American Legion

As the nation’s largest veteran service organization, the American Legion is committed to mentoring programs in communities across America, advocating for patriotism and honor, promoting strong national security and supporting service members and veterans.

The Center for Women Veterans recognizes the services and contributions of women Veterans. It gives information regarding VA and health care benefits for women.

http://www.benefits.va.gov/compensation/claims-postservice-agent_orange.asp

Veterans Exposed to Agent Orange
Veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange or other herbicides during military service may be eligible for a variety of VA benefits, including disability compensation for diseases associated with exposure. Your dependents and survivors also may be eligible for benefits.

“Agent Orange” refers to a blend of tactical herbicides the U.S. military sprayed in the jungles of Vietnam and around the Korean demilitarized zone to remove trees and dense tropical foliage that provided enemy cover. Herbicides were also used by the U.S. military to defoliate military facilities in the U.S. and in other countries as far back as the 1950s.
VA and federal law presumes that certain diseases are a result of exposure to these herbicides. This “presumptive policy” simplifies the process for receiving compensation for these diseases since VA foregoes the normal requirements of proving that an illness began during or was worsened by your military service.
A Veteran who believes he or she has a disease caused by Agent Orange exposure that is not one of the conditions listed below must show an actual connection between the disease and herbicide exposure during military service.

Eligibility – Service in Vietnam or Korea

VA presumes that Veterans were exposed to Agent Orange or other herbicides if they served:
• In Vietnam anytime between January 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975, including brief visits ashore or service aboard a ship that operated on the inland waterways of Vietnam
• In or near the Korean demilitarized zone anytime between April 1, 1968 and August 31, 1971
If you fall into either category listed above, you do not have to show that you were exposed to Agent Orange to be eligible for disability compensation for diseases VA presumes are associated with it. Check the list of U.S. Navy and Coast Guard ships that operated in Vietnam to confirm whether your service aboard a ship allows VA to concede you were exposed to Agent Orange..

Eligibility – Service Outside of Vietnam or Korea

 


Even if you did not serve in Vietnam or the Korean demilitarized zone during the specified time periods, you can still apply for disability compensation if you were exposed to an herbicide while in the military and believe it led to the onset of a disease. This includes:
• Veterans who served on or near the perimeters of military bases in Thailand during the Vietnam Era.
• Veterans who served where herbicides were tested and stored outside of Vietnam.
• Veterans who were crew members on C-123 planes flown after the Vietnam War.
• Veterans associated with Department of Defense (DoD) projects to test, dispose of, or store herbicides in the U.S.
If eligible, you must prove that you were exposed to Agent Orange or other herbicides during your military service to be eligible for service-connection for disease VA presumes are related to Agent Orange exposure.
Exception: Blue Water Veterans with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma may be granted service-connection without showing inland waterway service or that they set foot in Vietnam. This is because VA also recognizes non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma as related to service in Vietnam or the waters offshore of Vietnam during the Vietnam Era.

Diseases Associated with Agent Orange

 


VA currently presumes that some diseases resulted from exposure to herbicides like Agent Orange. The Veterans Health Administration’s Public Health website lists these diseases VA presumes are associated with exposure to Agent Orange or other herbicides during military service:

Evidence Needed

 


If you are seeking service connection for one of the diseases VA presumes is associated with exposure to herbicides during service, VA requires the following:
• A medical diagnosis of a disease which VA recognizes as being associated with Agent Orange (listed above)
• Competent evidence of
◦ service in Vietnam or at or near the Korean demilitarized zone during the dates shown above, or
◦ exposure to herbicides in a location other than the Vietnam or the Korean demilitarized zone.
• Competent medical evidence that the disease began within the deadline (if any). (See 38 CFR 3.307(a)(6)(ii) for more information on deadlines.)
If you believe that you have a disease caused by herbicide exposure, but that disease is not on the list of diseases associated with Agent Orange, you may still apply for service-connection. In these cases, VA requires all of the following:
• Competent medical evidence of a current disability,
• Competent medical evidence of an actual connection between herbicide exposure and the current disability, AND
• Competent evidence of:
◦ service in Vietnam or at or near the Korean demilitarized zone during the dates shown above, or
◦ exposure to herbicides in a location other than Vietnam or the Korean demilitarized zone.

Compensation Benefit

 


Monthly payment rates are based on the Veteran’s combined rating for his or her service-connected disabilities. These ratings are based on the severity of the disabilities. Additional amounts are paid to certain Veterans with severe disabilities (“special monthly compensation”) and certain Veterans with dependents. You can view the current Compensation Rate Tables to determine the amount you may receive.

How to Apply

 


Apply online using eBenefits, OR
• Work with an accredited representative or agent, OR
• Go to a VA regional office and have a VA employee assist you. You can find your regional office on our Facility Locator page
• Vietnam Veterans with chronic b-cell leukemias, Parkinson’s disease, or ischemic heart disease may apply for disability compensation for these diseases using VA’s Fast Track Claims Processing System
For more information on how to apply and for tips on making sure your claim is ready to be processed by VA, visit our How to Apply page.

More Information

 


Check VA’s Guide to Agent Orange Claims to learn more about how to establish eligibility to disability compensation and how much VA pays. You can also call the Agent Orange Help Line at 1-800-749-8387 or send an e-mail to [email protected]. You must provide your name, e-mail address, telephone and/or fax number, and VA file number/Social Security Number. We will do our best to respond within a reasonable amount of time (usually 3 to 10 workdays).

Types of Compensation

 


VA disability compensation provides monthly benefits to Veterans in recognition of the effects of disabilities, diseases, or injuries incurred or aggravated during active military service. The program also provides monthly payments to surviving spouses, dependent children, and dependent parents in recognition of the economic loss caused by a Veteran’s death during military service or, after discharge from military service, as a result of a service-connected disability. A summary of VA’s disability compensation programs is below.

Disability Compensation

 


A tax-free monetary benefit paid to Veterans with disabilities that are the result of a disease or injury incurred or aggravated during active military service. The benefit amount is graduated according to the degree of the Veteran’s disability on a scale from 10 percent to 100 percent (in increments of 10 percent). Compensation may also be paid for disabilities that are considered related or secondary to disabilities occurring in service and for disabilities presumed to be related to circumstances of military service, even though they may arise after service. Generally, the degrees of disability specified are also designed to compensate for considerable loss of working time from exacerbations or illnesses.
» Learn more about Disability Compensation.

Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC)

 


DIC is a tax-free monetary benefit generally payable to a surviving spouse, child, or parent of Servicemembers who died while on active duty, active duty for training, or inactive duty training, or to survivors of Veterans who died from their service-connected disabilities. Parents DIC is an income-based benefit for parents who were financially dependent on of a Servicemember or Veteran who died from a service-related cause.
» Learn more about DIC and Parents DIC

Special Monthly Compensation (SMC)

 


SMC is an additional tax-free benefit that can be paid to Veterans, their spouses, surviving spouses and parents. For Veterans, Special Monthly Compensation is a higher rate of compensation paid due to special circumstances such as the need of aid and attendance by another person or by specific disability, such as loss of use of one hand or leg. For spouses and surviving spouses, this benefit is commonly referred to as aid and attendance and is paid based on the need of aid and attendance by another person.
» Learn more about Special Monthly Compensation

Claims Based on Special Circumstances

 


Veterans may be eligible for other types of disability compensation once a disability has been determined to be service connected. Special VA disability compensation programs include: individual unemployability, automobile allowance, clothing allowance, prestabilization, hospitalization, convalescence, dental, and birth defects.
» Learn more about Special Claims

Types of Claims

 


There are numerous types of claims that apply to disability compensation. They can be based on disabilities that existed when entering military service, but were made worse, disabilities that occurred during service, or disabilities that arose after you left military service. Additionally, there are claims that are filed for special circumstances.

Pre-Discharge Claims

 


Servicemembers that are within 180 days of separation or retirement from active duty or full time National Guard duty may file claims for disability compensation. Learn more about pre-discharge claims »

Claims Based on Pre-Service Disabilities

 


Individuals may enter military service with a known disability. Should this disability become worse due to military service, VA may be able to pay compensation. This is known as aggravation; however, compensation can only be paid for the level of aggravation. For example, at entry into military service, an individual has a disabling condition that could be considered 10% disabling. In order for this condition to be considered aggravated, it would have to have worsened due to military service to at least 20%.

Claims Based on In-Service Disabilities

 


These claims are based on disabilities that are a result of an injury or disease that occurred in active service, and in the line of duty. Injuries or diseases as a result of the Veteran’s own willful misconduct or abuse of alcohol or drugs are excluded.

 

Claims Based on Post-Service Disabilities

Claims Based on Post-Service – Diseases After Service

 


Veterans with service-related disabilities that appear after they are discharged may still be eligible for disability compensation. An overview of these types of disability compensation claims is below.

Agent Orange

 


VA presumes that if you served in Vietnam or in or near the Korean demilitarized zones, during certain time periods, you were exposed to Agent Orange. As a Veteran with this service who also has a disease related to Agent Orange exposure you may be eligible for disability compensation. Veterans who have a disease associated with Agent Orange, but who do not meet the service requirements for VA to “presume” they were exposed to Agent Orange must show an actual connection between the disease and herbicide exposure during military service.

» Learn more about Agent Orange

Disabilities That Appear Within One Year After Discharge

 


Veterans with certain diseases that presented themselves after discharge from military service may be eligible for disability compensation. This includes certain diseases that were not incurred in or aggravated by military service, but which VA presumes are related to military service if shown to exist within a certain time period after service. Examples include: hypertension, arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and peptic ulcers.

» Learn more about Disabilities That Appear Within One Year After Discharge

Exposures to Hazardous Materials

 


Veterans may have been exposed to a range of chemical, physical, and environmental hazards during military service. Veterans may be entitled to disability compensation if exposure to these hazards resulted in a disease or injury. Examples include exposure to radiation, mustard gas, and asbestos.

» Learn more about Exposures to Hazardous Materials

Gulf War Illnesses

 


Gulf War Veterans suffering from what is commonly referred to as “Gulf War Syndrome,” which is a cluster of medically unexplained chronic symptoms that can include fatigue, headaches, joint pain, indigestion, insomnia, dizziness, respiratory disorders, and memory problems may be eligible for disability compensation. In addition, Gulf War Veterans who served in Southwest Asia and have a disability resulting from certain infectious diseases may be eligible for disability compensation.

» Learn more about Gulf War Illnesses

Prisoners of War (POWs)

 


VA presumes that certain medical conditions are associated with a Former POW’s captivity. If you are a former POW who has been diagnosed as having one or more of these conditions to a degree that is at least 10 percent disabling, VA presumes that it is associated with the POW experience and you are entitled to disability compensation.

» Learn more about Prisoners of War (POWs)
Claims for post-service disabilities would include claims for disabilities that are a result of disabilities considered to be service-related, even though the disability arose after service. There are various classifications of presumptive disabilities which can be based on location or circumstances of service or just by military service itself. Learn more about post service claims »

Claims Based on Special Circumstances

 


Claims regarding compensation are not always based on an in-service event. In other words, after a disability has been determined to be service connected, there may be other types of claims a Veteran or surviving spouse may wish to file. This might include a claim for a temporary 100% rating due to surgery for a service-connected disability, or additional compensation based on being in need of regular aid and attendance. Learn more about special claims »

How VA Identifies Claims
Original Claim

 


An original claim is the first claim you file for compensation from VA. This can be filed by a Servicemember, Veteran or survivors of deceased Veterans.

Reopened Claim

 


A reopened claim is a claim filed for a benefit that could not be granted and the decision has become final, meaning that it is over one year old and has not been appealed. VA cannot reopen these claims unless new and material evidence is received. New evidence is evidence that the VA has never before considered in connection with the specific benefit claimed. Material evidence is evidence that is relevant to and has a direct bearing on the issue at hand.

Example 1

 


A Veteran was treated several times during service for pain in the right elbow. He filed a claim for service connection in 1989, but his claim could not be granted because no orthopedic abnormalities were found on VA examination. Two years later, his private physician x-rayed the elbow and noted arthritic changes in the joint. The Veteran submitted the new evidence to VA. Because it suggested a residual of his in-service elbow problems did exist, VA reopened his claim.

Example 2

A Veteran was discharged from service in 1977. He filed an original claim for service connection for pes planus (flat foot) 20 years later. VA was unable to grant his claim because pes planus was never noted in the Veteran’s service treatment records. In 2001, he attempted to reopen his claim by submitting a statement from his private physician confirming the diagnosis of pes planus. VA was unable to reopen the claim because, while the evidence was “new,” it was not “material,” in that it failed to demonstrate the Veteran was diagnosed with pes planus during service.

New Claim

A new claim is a claim for a benefit that may or may not have been filed before. Generally, the decision made on the claim is based entirely on new evidence. These may include claims for:
• An increased disability evaluation
• Special monthly compensation
• Individual unemployability
A new claim differs from a reopened claim in that a decision on the claim is totally independent of any evidence submitted in connection with an earlier claim.

Secondary Claim

These are claims for disabilities that developed as a result of or were worsened by another service-connected condition. In other words, it is recognized that a service-connected disability may cause a second disability. This second disability may not otherwise be considered service-connected.

Example 1

A Veteran has a service-connected knee injury that causes him to walk with a limp. He subsequently develops arthritis in his hip. Although the arthritic condition was not incurred during or aggravated by service, service-connection may still be established if the arthritis is a result of his knee condition.

Example 2

A Veteran was in the Army for twenty years. During her military service, she was diagnosed with hypertension. After her discharge, service-connection was established for hypertension. She was subsequently diagnosed with a heart condition. Service-connection for her heart condition may be established as secondary to the hypertension.

How To Apply

 


For more information on how to apply and for tips on making sure your claim is ready to be processed by VA, visit our How to Apply page.

Evidence Requirements

 


You must submit all relevant evidence in your possession and/or provide information sufficient to enable VA to obtain all relevant evidence not in your possession. This includes the following as part of your application:
• Discharge or separation papers (DD214 or equivalent)
• Service Treatment Records if they are in your possession
• Medical evidence (doctor & hospital reports)

Fully Developed Claim

 


VA established the Fully Developed Claim Program to expeditiously process claims certified by the claimant or his/her representative as meeting the Fully Developed Claim criteria. In order for you to participate in the Fully Developed Claim Program, you must obtain the relevant service treatment and personnel records and provide them to VA.
If VA decides your claim before one year from the date it is received, you will still have the remainder of the one-year period to submit additional information or evidence necessary to support your claim. For this program, VA will only obtain service treatment records and Federal treatment records when you identify them. More information about this program is available on the Fully Developed Claims page.

Standard Claim

As a standard claim, VA is responsible for getting relevant records from any Federal agency that you adequately identify and authorize VA to obtain.
VA will make every reasonable effort to obtain relevant records not held by a Federal agency that you adequately identify and authorize VA to obtain. These may include privately held evidence and information you tell us about (such as records from a private doctor or hospital) and/or records from State or local governments or current or former employers.
VA will provide a medical examination for you, or get a medical opinion, if determined it is necessary to make a claims decision.

Veterans Claims Assistance Act (VCAA)

 


In November 2000, Congress passed the Veterans Claims Assistance Act (VCAA) to define what VA’s responsibilities are in assisting claimants in obtaining evidence to support a claim and also to define the responsibilities of the claimant. VCAA responsibilities are as follows:
VA’s Responsibilities include:
• Obtaining relevant records from any Federal agency. This may include records from the military, VA Medical Centers (including private facilities where VA authorized treatment), or the Social Security Administration.
• Providing a medical examination, or obtaining a medical opinion, if determined it is necessary to decide the claim.
A Claimant’s Responsibilities include:
• Obtaining relevant records not held by a Federal agency. This may include records from State or local governments, private doctors and hospitals, or current or former employers. VA may assist in obtaining these records.
• Providing enough information to VA so that records may be requested.

Example

 


A Veteran has filed a claim for disability compensation and, on the application, indicated treatment from a private doctor and an award of Social Security disability. In this case, VA would be responsible in obtaining the Social Security records and would assist in obtaining the private physician records, but ultimate responsibility in obtaining the private records would be with the Veteran.

Disability Benefits Questionnaires (DBQs)

 


With Disability Benefits Questionnaires (DBQs) Veterans now have more control over the disability claims process. Veterans have the option of visiting a private health care provider instead of a VA facility to complete their disability evaluation form.
Veterans can have their providers fill out any of the more than 70 DBQs that are appropriate for their conditions and submit them to us. It’s that easy!
See our instruction pages to help you with the process. I am a VeteranVSOHealth Care Provider.

Where can I see a listing of the Questionnaires?

 


Visit our DBQ List by Form Name or DBQ List by Symptom pages to see the available forms.

Who fills them out?

 


For VA exams, a VA clinician will fill out the DBQ. If being seen by a private provider, have
them complete the DBQ and submit it to us either by Regional Office Fax Numbers
or mail.

Where can I get more information?

 


See our DBQ Frequently Asked Questions for more information. You can also call us at
1-800-827-1000 or Ask us a Question.
DBQs also help support VA’s Fully Developed Claims (FDC) Program. DBQs are valuable for claims processing because they provide medical information that is directly relevant to determining a disability rating. When submitted with a fully developed claim, DBQs ensure VA’s rating specialists have precisely the information they need to start processing the claim.

Disability Benefits Questionnaires (DBQs) are downloadable forms for Veterans to use in the disability evaluation process. DBQs can help speed the processing of compensation and pension claims.
DBQs allow Veterans and Servicemembers to have more control over their disability claims process by giving them the option of completing an examination with their own healthcare provider instead of at a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facility.
DBQs enable private healthcare providers to capture important information needed by VA to accurately evaluate and promptly decide Veterans’ claims for benefits.
More than 70 DBQs are available that use check boxes and standardized language to streamline the process. DBQs average about five pages in length. Veterans are responsible for any fees their private provider may charge for completing a DBQ.

How to Find and Submit a DBQ

The DBQ process involves four steps:
• Access the form online and download it;
• Have your healthcare provider complete the form;
• Save a copy for your records; and
• Submit the form to VA.
The DBQ forms are available on our “List by DBQ Form Name” page.

VBA Transformation

 


DBQs are an important example of the initiatives the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) is implementing under its Transformation Plan. The goals of VBA’s Transformation are:
• eliminate the backlog in disability claims;
• increase access to services and benefits; and
• end Veteran homelessness
VBA is committed to providing world-class service by transforming the way it does business. People, process, and technology changes will help VBA reach its goal of increasing efficiency and engaging Veterans, Servicemembers, their families, and survivors’ when, where, and how they desire.

Veterans Benefits Administration

 


VBA serves as a leading advocate for Veterans, Servicemembers, and their families. VBA’s mission is to deliver with excellence benefits and services that honors their military service, assist them in their readjustment, enhance their lives, and engender their full trust.
VBA is responsible for:
• compensation and pension programs for Veterans and their survivors;
• education programs for Veterans, Servicemembers, and certain Veterans’ dependents, and survivors;
• the home loan guaranty program for Veterans, certain spouses, and Servicemembers;
• life insurance programs for Servicemembers and Veterans; and
the vocational rehabilitation and employment programs for Veterans and Servicemembers with service-connected disabilities who want help preparing for, finding, and keeping suitable jobs.

http://benefits.va.gov/COMPENSATION/dbq_ListByDBQFormName.asp?expandable=0&subexpandable=1

Veteran Instructions

 


You are using this Disability Benefits Questionnaire (DBQ) as part of your application to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for disability benefits. For VA to use a DBQ to process your claim, your doctor must provide all requested medical information.
Important: VA will not pay or reimburse any expenses or costs incurred in the process of completing and/or submitting a DBQ. VA reserves the right to confirm the authenticity of all DBQs completed by private health care providers.

Steps
1. Find the appropriate DBQ based on your claimed disability.
Go to http://benefits.va.gov/COMPENSATION/dbq_disabilityexams.asp
Select the appropriate DBQ by using the “List by DBQ Form Name” or “List by Symptoms” web pages.
Either download the DBQ so the doctor can complete it or print the DBQ for your doctor to complete it by hand.

2. Take the DBQ to your doctor and have your doctor complete the form.
Your doctor must follow all instructions carefully.
Legibility is important! Therefore, VA prefers that your doctor completes the DBQ electronically. If your doctor completes it by hand, please ask him to make sure VA can read the information.
Ensure your doctor completes the last section of the DBQ by providing his or her name, signature, and contact information. VA will only accept a DBQ signed by a doctor. A doctor completing an electronic DBQ must print it to sign it.

3. Obtain a copy of the completed DBQ for your records.

4. If your DBQ was completed by a VA provider, skip to step 5.
If your DBQ was completed by a non-VA provider, complete a VA Form 21-4142 for “DBQ Purposes”.
(This is so we can request additional information if clarification is needed.)
Open Authorization and Consent to Release Information.
Fill out the medical provider information
Indicate “For DBQ Purposes Only” under Comments in Box #9.
Save and print the form.
Sign the form.

5. Submit the completed DBQ to VA.
If a VA Form 21-4142 was also completed in Step 4, please submit it along with the DBQ to VA.
You or your doctor can fax, mail, or personally deliver the DBQ to the VA Regional Office (RO) responsible for handling you claim. You can find the RO’s mailing address and fax number on the DBQ website.

Welcome to the Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Program’s Home Page

What is the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program?

The Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Program is authorized by Congress under Title 38, USC, Chapter 31 and Code of Federal Regulations, Part 21. It is sometimes referred to as the Chapter 31 program. This program assists Veterans with service-connected disabilities to prepare for, find, and keep suitable jobs. For Veterans with service-connected disabilities so severe that they cannot immediately consider work, this program offers services to improve their ability to live as independently as possible.

Services that may be provided by the VR&E Program include:

Comprehensive rehabilitation evaluation to determine abilities, skills, and interests for employment
• Vocational counseling and rehabilitation planning for employment services
• Employment services such as job-training, job-seeking skills, resume development, and other work readiness assistance
• Assistance finding and keeping a job, including the use of special employer incentives and job accommodations
• On the Job Training (OJT), apprenticeships, and non-paid work experiences
• Post-secondary training at a college, vocational, technical or business school
• Supportive rehabilitation services including case management, counseling, and medical referrals
• Independent living services for Veterans unable to work due to the severity of their disabilities

Who is Eligible for VR&E Services?
• Active Duty Service Members are eligible if they:

Expect to receive an honorable discharge upon separation from active duty
Obtain a memorandum rating of 20% or more from the VA
Apply for Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) services

• 
Veterans are eligible if they:

Have received, or will receive, a discharge that is other than dishonorable
Have a service-connected disability rating of at least 10%, or a memorandum rating of 20% or more from the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA)
Apply for Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) services

• 
Basic period of Eligibility

The basic period of eligibility in which VR&E services may be used is 12 years from the latter of the following:

Date of separation from active military service, or
Date the veteran was first notified by VA of a service-connected disability rating.

• 
The basic period of eligibility may be extended if a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) determines that a Veteran has a Serious Employment Handicap

What Happens after Eligibility is Established?

The Veteran is scheduled to meet with a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) for a comprehensive evaluation to determine if he / she is entitled for services. A comprehensive evaluation includes:

• An assessment of the Veteran’s interests, aptitudes, and abilities
• An assessment of whether service connected disabilities impair the Veteran’s ability to find and / or hold a job using the occupational skills he or she has already developed
• Vocational exploration and goal development leading to employment and / or maximum independence at home and in the Veteran’s community

What is an Entitlement Determination?

A Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) works with the Veteran to complete a determination if an employment handicap exists. An employment handicap exists if the Veteran’s service connected disability impairs his / her ability to obtain and maintain a job. Entitlement to services is established if the veteran has an employment handicap and is within his or her 12-year basic period of eligibility and has a 20 % or greater service-connected disability rating.

If the service connected disability rating is less than 20%, or if the Veteran is beyond the 12-year basic period of eligibility, then a serious employment handicap must be found to establish entitlement to VR&E services. A serious employment handicap is based on the extent of services required to help a Veteran to overcome his or her service and non-service connected disabilities permitting the return to suitable employment.

What Happens after the Entitlement Determination is Made?

The Veteran and Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) work together to:
• Determine transferable skills, aptitudes, and interests
• Identify viable employment and / or independent living services options
• Explore labor market and wage information
• Identify physical demands and other job characteristics
• Narrow vocational options to identify a suitable employment goal
• Select a VR&E program track leading to an employment or independent living goal
• Investigate training requirements
• Identify resources needed to achieve rehabilitation
• Develop an individualized rehabilitation plan to achieve the identified employment and / or independent living goals

What is a Rehabilitation Plan?

A rehabilitation plan is an individualized, written outline of the services, resources and criteria that will be used to achieve employment and / or independent living goals. The plan is an agreement that is signed by the Veteran and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) and is updated as needed to assist the Veteran to achieve his / her goals.

Depending on their circumstances, veterans will work with their VRC to select one of the following five tracks of services (see definitions for more detail):

• Reemployment (with a former employer)
• Direct job placement services for new employment
• Self-employment
• Employment through long term services including OJT, college, and other training
• Independent living services

What Happens after the Rehabilitation Plan is Developed?

After a plan is developed and signed, a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) or case manager will continue to work with the Veteran to implement the plan to achieve suitable employment and / or independent living. The VRC or case manager will provide ongoing counseling, assistance, and coordinate of services such as tutorial assistance, training in job-seeking skills, medical and dental referrals, adjustment counseling, payment of training allowance, if applicable, and other services as required to help the Veteran achieve rehabilitation.

Summary of the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program (Chapter 31) Process

A VA Veteran who is eligible for an evaluation under Chapter 31 must first apply for services and receive an appointment with a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC). The VRC will work with the Veteran to determine if an employment handicap exists as a result of his or her service connected disability. If an employment handicap is established and the Veteran is found entitled to services. The VRC and the Veteran will continue counseling to select a track of services and jointly develop a plan to address the Veteran’s rehabilitation and employment needs.

The rehabilitation plan will specify an employment or independent living goal, identify intermediate goals, and outline services and resources that VA will provide to assist the Veteran to achieve his / her goals. The VRC and the Veteran will work together to implement the plan to assist the Veteran to achieve his or her employment and / or independent living goals.

A Veteran found not to be entitled to services, the VRC will help him or her locate other resources to address any rehabilitation and employment needs identified during the evaluation. Referral to other resources may include state vocational rehabilitation programs; Department of Labor employment programs for disabled veterans; state, federal or local agencies providing services for employment or small business development; internet-based resources for rehabilitation and employment; and information about applying for financial aid.

http://www.dvnf.org/resources/women-veteran-resources/

The National Women’s Trauma Recovery (WTRP) serves as a residential program for women and enhances interpersonal functional through psycho-education, skill building and focuses on coping skills.
The National Resource Directory provides many resources that are available for women veterans such as housing, child care and health services.
The Business and Professional Women’s Foundation creates a strong relationship between women and the workplace. They offer a mentorship and workforce development program.
Employment Resources for Women
Please visit the Department of Labor (DOL) to learn about specific employment resources that the Women’s Bureau offers.
To stay informed on all of DVNF Programs for Veterans, Register for our ENews Here.

National Coalition for Homeless Veterans

Women Veterans

For the first time in U.S. history, women comprise about 11 percent of American troops serving in combat theaters in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) estimates women will soon account for 10 percent of the total veteran population. Women veterans have unique needs and challenges that affect their ability to maintain meaningful employment – for instance, many are single parents with dependent children and have histories of trauma, especially of a sexual nature. VA and community-based service providers have developed programs offering specialized services for women.

• All VA medical centers and many Readjustment Counseling (Vet) Centers have a designated Women Veterans Program Manager to help women veterans access VA benefits and health care services. For a state-by-state listing of Veterans Health Administration facilities, click here.

• VA began a systemwide initiative in November 2008 to make comprehensive primary care for women veterans available at every VA medical facility (medical centers and community-based outpatient clinics). According to a GAO report released in July 2009, the facilities are in various stages of implementing this initiative.

• All Veterans Benefits Administration regional offices have a Women Veterans Coordinator to help women veterans apply for VA benefits and assistance programs. To locate your local office, click here.

• Most State Departments of Veterans Affairs have a designated Women Veterans Coordinator to help women veterans. A list of coordinators can be found here.

• Some community-based organizations have programs specifically designed for homeless women veterans; find an organization near you here.
A collection of employment-specific resources for women veterans can be found below.

RESOURCES
The Business and Professional Women’s (BPW) Foundation, a research and education institution solely dedicated to issues that affect working women, published an initial report in 2007 titled “Understanding the Complexity of Women Veterans’ Career Transitions” as part of its “Women Veterans in Transition” research project. Subsequent BPW publications based on that research include:

• Recommendations for Employers to Recruit and Retain Women Veterans (PDF)
• Building Strong Programs and Policies to Support Women Veterans (PDF)
• Recommendations to Support Women Veterans (PDF)
BPW’s “Women Veterans in Transition” page features other resources that address employer attitudes, public service sector employment and the job search process.

BPW also has a Connect-A-Vet webpage with nearly 200 links to resources for women veterans. These resources cover a range of topics including employment, education, finances, government agencies and programs, housing services and facilities, health, legal support, and professional organizations and special groups.

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)’s Center for Women Veterans website contains important statistics and resources about women veterans. From there, you can link to the Advisory Committee on Women Veterans page and view reports from the committee’s meetings. A PDF of VA Homeless Veterans Programs Director Pete Dougherty’s presentation to the committee on Oct. 28, 2009, is available via the site and here as well.

LITERATURE

Employment Assistance Guide for Service Providers Helping Homeless Veterans 
National Coalition for Homeless Veterans

NCHV produced this guide in partnership with DOL-VETS to enhance the assistance offered by employment specialists working with homeless clients. It provides an overview of special challenges faced by homeless men and women, and identifies the community resources in place to help them with housing, health, income supports, job search and placement assistance, substance abuse and family counseling, and other services they may need. There is also a comprehensive list of employment assistance resources, both public and private.

Understanding the Complexity of Women Veterans’ Career Transitions
Business and Professional Women’s Foundation

This research project report examines the results of a 2007 survey, which was undertaken as part of a pilot study on the career transition experiences of women veterans.

Homeless Female Veterans: White Paper
 National Coalition for Homeless Veterans

 This paper explores the recent rise of homelessness among female veterans and looks at the unique challenges that increase their susceptibility to homelessness. The final page lists resources for female veterans in need of assistance.This report provides a brief historical perspective of women in the military and accounts for the population, age, geographic distribution, socio-economic characteristics and other identifying features of women veterans.

 

Women Veterans’ Issues and Treatment

Army Veteran Jennifer Crane discusses her recovery from

PTSD and substance abuse
More women are serving in the military in more capacities than ever before. Currently, there are approximately 1.8 million women veterans (8 percent of the total veteran population). The VA estimates that by 2020, that number will increase to 10 percent of the total veteran population. Currently, about 15 percent of all military personnel in Iraq are women, and female troops are stationed in some of the most dangerous areas. In response, the Veterans Administration is developing services and supports designed to meet the unique needs of women veterans, though there may be disparities in access to benefits: it has been suggested that women veterans may face additional obstacles when filing PTSD-related claims.

For example, the Department of Veterans Affairs offers a Center for Women Veterans on its website and the VA Palo Alto Health Care System introduced the Women’s Health Care Center in 2002. Designed to be sensitive to women’s concerns, it offers individual and group therapy, with psychoeducational classes and seminars tailored to the unique needs of women veterans. The Women Veterans Health program was elevated to a Strategic Health Care Group within the Office of Public Health and Environmental Hazards in 2007.

As part of the National Center for PTSD in Menlo Park, Calif., the Department of Veterans Affairs also introduced the National Women’s Trauma Recovery Program to treat women veterans living with PTSD or Military Sexual Trauma (MST). According to the National Center for PTSD, women in the military run a double risk of developing PTSD—10 percent of women versus 4 percent of male service members—for reasons ranging from battle stress and sexual harassment to assault. The VA also says that women may take longer to recover from PTSD and are four times more likely than men to experience long-lasting PTSD.

For women veterans we have included information on gender-specific PTSD treatment as well as VA services and links to organizations serving women veterans.

Resources

Vietnam Veterans of America, Women Veterans Committee
Reports and information on a wide array of issues important to the women who served in Vietnam and other wars.

Women’s Health USA 2009
 An easy-to-use collection of current and historical data on some of the most pressing health challenges facing women, their families and their communities.

The Women Veterans Health Care Improvement Act of 2009 
This legislation authorized a study to assess the physical, mental and reproductive effects of conflict upon women who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan VA health care services It will also help the Veterans Administration to provide evidence-based treatment to women with sexual trauma.

VA Pledge to Women Veterans on Women’s Equality Day 
Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki pledged that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will work to ensure the nation upholds its obligation to meet the needs of our veterans—including women veterans.

WOVEN—Women Veterans Network 
A community of women veterans spanning all ages, services, ranks, experiences and geographies, the network is woven together by a common desire to connect for social support and camaraderie, share information and resources and serve our fellow veterans and local communities.

Women Veterans of America 
Women Veterans of America is an advocacy organization founded by, and run for, women veterans.

MilitaryWoman.org
 MilitaryWoman.org is an online meeting place for military women to exchange information and provide information to women contemplating military service.

Department of Veterans’ Affairs Center for Women Veterans
 The Department of Veterans’ Affairs Center for Women Veterans provides information on health care, benefits, sexual trauma and readjustment counseling.

American Women in Uniform, Veterans Too!
 American Women in Uniform, Veterans Too! is a resouce page dedicated to women in the miltary, created and maintained by Captain Barbara A. Wilson, USAF (Ret).

VA Women’s Mental Health Center 
The VA Women’s Mental Health Center was created in recognition of women veterans and their right for gender-sensitive, high quality mental health care.

NCPTSD Fact Sheet for Women 
The National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (NCPTSD) has developed a number of fact sheets on issues specific to women and trauma.

PTSD in Women Returning From Combat: Future Directions in Research
This 2009 repor from the Society for Women’s Health Research examines issues such as gender differences in PTSD and combat-related concerns uniquely affecting women.

Women Warriors: Supporting She “Who Has Borne the Battle”
 This report from the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, provides valuable information about challenges women face on the battlefield and when they return to civilian society.

Women Combat Veterans Often Live With Posttraumatic Stress in Silence 
As women return to a society unfamiliar with their wartime roles, they often choose isolation over embarrassment.

Lecture Series Tackles Problems Facing Female Veterans 
Women veterans are four times more likely to be homeless than a male vet, said Denise Duman, the women veterans program manager at the James E. Van Zandt VA Medical Center.

Newsweek Article: 15 Percent of Veterans Report Sexual Trauma to the VA 
A study released by the VA’s National Center for PTSD found that 15 percent of the Iraq/Afghanistan vets seeking treatment at VA facilities report experiencing some kind of sexual trauma while serving in the military.

Veteran in crisis? Dial 1.877.424.3838 for 24/7

VA National Call Center for Homeless Veterans

Call this confidential hotline 24 hours a day, seven days a week to find help for homeless Veterans and their families. 1-877-4AID VET (1-877-424-3838).

American Women Veterans Foundation

Learn about the American women Veterans foundation and how to help homeless female Veterans transition to civilian life.
americanwomenveterans.org

Final Salute

Offers the H.O.M.E and S.A.F.E. programs that provide housing and financial assistance to homeless female Veterans in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.
www.finalsaluteinc.org

www.publichealth.va.gov

Grace After Fire

Connect with women Veterans and clinical providers who specialize in treating mental health, substance abuse and trauma issues of women who have served.

www.graceafterfire.org

Health Screening Tests

Find men’s and women’s low-cost health resources and free testing locations for breast cancer, cervical cancer, prostate health, STDs, vision, hearing, and more.

www.healthfinder.gov

Homeless Assistance Resources In Your State

Find homeless assistance resources in your state through the National Resource Directory. Select your state, then select Homeless Assistance.

www.nationalresourcedirectory.gov

Homeless Women Veterans Listening Sessions

Learn about the unique needs of homeless women Veterans based on interviews conducted by the Department of Labor.

www.dol.gov

Homeless Women Veterans Resources

Find research, reports and guides on homeless women Veterans, gathered by the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans.
nchv.org

Low-Cost Prenatal Care

Offers tips on healthy pregnancy and resources for low-cost care. Provided by Department of Health & Human Services.
mchb.hrsa.gov

Mesothelioma Veterans Center

Mesothelioma Veterans Center offers free support to veterans diagnosed with Mesothelioma. Let our VA-accredited claims agent help you today!

https://www.mesotheliomaveterans.org/veterans

Old Pueblo Community Services – Oasis House

Provides transitional housing, clinical, and supportive services for Veterans. Focuses on employment and future permanent housing needs after graduating from the programs.

www.helptucson.org

Service Women’s Action Network

Connects women Veterans to mentors for personal and professional guidance, legal advice and counseling services.

www.servicewomen.org

Strengthening At Risk & Homeless Young Mothers & Children

Learn about resources and support for homeless mothers and their children provided by the National Center to End Family Homelessness. www.familyhomelessness.org

Trauma Informed Care for Women Veterans Experiencing Homelessness

Commissioned by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Women’s Bureau (WB) as one of its many efforts to help women veterans who are experiencing homelessness find jobs and successfully reintegrate back to civilian life. www.dol.gov

VA Center for Women Veterans

…Access information, fact sheets, frequently asked questions, and reports for women Veterans covering health care, mental health and sexual trauma counseling. www1.va.gov

VA Women Veteran Services

Learn about VA health care benefits offered only to women Veterans. www4.va.gov

Women Marines Association Emergency Fund for Veterans

Provides assistance up to $1,000 to help women Veterans facing emergency short-term needs due to severe illness, loss of support and catastrophic accidents. www.womenmarines.org

Women Veterans Health Care

Provides information on health care services available to women Veterans, including comprehensive primary care, specialty care covering reproductive services, and rehabilitation, mental health and treatment for military sexual trauma. Contact the nearest VA Medical Center and ask for the Women Veterans Program Manager. www.womenshealth.va.gov

Women, Infant & Children Nutrition Program

Provides grants to states to provide supplemental foods and nutrition education for low-income pregnant, breastfeeding, and non-breastfeeding postpartum women, and infants and children. www.fns.usda.gov

Womenshealth.gov

Offers free women’s health information on topics including; major health concerns, prevention information, frequently asked questions, news and events and more. www.womenshealth.gov www.onewearysoldier.blogspot.com Women in Military Service for America www.womensmemorial.orga Female veteran resources in the San Francisco Bay Area. Counseling and Health Services The San Francisco VA Medical Center/VA Hospital offers a variety of health services to address the unique needs of women veterans. Women who have served in the Armed Forces are eligible for a variety of veterans benefits. VA actively encourages women to utilize the benefits due them. To make an appointment, please contact the Women’s Comprehensive Health Clinic at (415) 750-2174 or click here to learn more.

Mental Health and Sexual Trauma Counseling:
Swords to Plowshares assists women veterans with their psychological needs, including:
• Mental health counseling
• Sexual trauma counseling
• Substance abuse treatment
• Psychological support groups (i.e., Coping with Depression, Stress Management, * * Trauma Recovery, Substance Abuse Treatment for Women)

http://www.swords-to-plowshares.org/wp-content/uploads/Vet-Center-logo1.jpg?f31510 San Francisco Vet Center
If you have served in any combat zone, Vet Centers are in your community to help you and your family with readjustment counseling and outreach services. YouÕve earned these benefits and there is no cost to you or your family members. If you need additional information please visit their website.
http://www.swords-to-plowshares.org/wp-content/uploads/graceafterfire-logo_high-res1.jpg?f31510 Grace After Fire was created by women to provide an online resource for women veterans – women helping women. Here you can truly be yourself, laugh, cry, share – and safely gather to identify. YouÕll find resources, experts, and fellow women vets around the world that understand where youÕre coming from. We can help one another cope with the challenges of readjustment and heal from addiction, alcoholism, depression, relationship troubles, and the hidden effects of post traumatic stress, military sexual trauma, and more. Your strength and resiliency can help those in need and begin the healing process, together.
http://www.swords-to-plowshares.org/wp-content/uploads/Swan-logo1.jpg?f31510 The Service WomenÕs Action Network (SWAN) supports and develops the leadership of veterans, mentors young women considering military service, works to solve problems facing women in uniform, and provides and promotes services that are healing to women after their military service experience. SWAN establishes a worldwide network of military women, veterans and allies to provide lasting support, community and resources.
http://www.swords-to-plowshares.org/wp-content/uploads/American-Women-Veterans1.jpg?f31510 The American Women Veterans organization is dedicated to being the voice of Women Service Members and Veterans from all branches and eras. Check them out on FaceBook or www.americanwomenveterans.org.
http://www.swords-to-plowshares.org/wp-content/uploads/Marine-Women1.jpg?f31510 Women Marines Association is the only veterans association for and about women Marines. WMA is a non-profit 501©3 veteran organization. WMA has established an Emergency Fund for Veterans who have short-term emergency financial needs, such as skills training, loss of support, severe illness, and catastrophic accidents.
http://www.swords-to-plowshares.org/wp-content/uploads/NCHV-logo3.jpg?f31510 National Coalition for Homeless Veterans: Women Veterans Resources
The Department of Veterans Affairs has awarded grants to eight community-based homeless veteran service providers to support programs designed specifically for women veterans, including those with dependent children. The grants are funded under the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program.

A Directory of distinguished attorneys representing veterans and dependents for rightful VA benefits.

This public domain and non-profit list of avA Directory of distinguished attorneys representing veterans and dependents for rightful VA benefitsailable private attorneys is maintained as a pro bono public service in honor of the nation’s military veterans and dependents who seek representation for rightful VA benefits. All listed attorneys are admitted to practice before the VA with required accreditation, the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims (CAVC), and the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (unless noted). All are members of the National Organization of Veterans Advocates, Inc. (NOVA). For more information on NOVA, see www.vetadvocates.org . Such veteran’s attorneys are difficult to locate since there are only a few hundred in the entire United States. Access to this web site has steadily increased in traffic over the years due to this need.

Effective June 20, 2007, veterans are allowed to retain an attorney after the first denial by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) at the Notice of Disagreement stage.

Veterans and dependents are invited to contact these attorneys about representation, attorney fees, expenses, and the procedural requirements for retaining an attorney. All names are listed with permission. Attorneys are list by State.

VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Helping disabled persons receive Veterans Disability, Social Security Disability and Long Term Disability.

Alabama Other Information
Sid Hughes Attorney at Law P.O. Box 19852 Homewood, Alabama 35219 phone: 205-943-0500 fax :205-879-9229 email: [email protected] web site: VA Accreditation: YES NOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information:
Ronald C. SykstusAttorney at LawBond, Botes, Sykstus, Tanner & Ezzell, P.C.415 Church Street, Suite 100Huntsville, Alabama 35801

phone: (256)539-9899

(Office)fax: (256)713-0237

(Fax)phone: (256)713-0221 (Direct Voice)

Email: [email protected]

Web: www.bondnbotes.com

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YESAdmitted to CAVC: YESRepresents at all levels: YESOther Information: Former U.S. Army active-duty and reserve JAG Officer. Admitted to Practice in Alabama, Illinois, Tennessee and Washington, D.C.
Alaska
Paul B. Eaglin Attorney at Law Eaglin Law Office 250 Cushman St., Suite 2C PO Box 81910 Fairbanks, Alaska 99708-1910 phone: (907) 374 4744 fax: (907) 374 4766 email: [email protected] web site: VA Accreditation: YES NOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Representing veterans and dependents. Practice includes representation of Social Security disability claimants before the SSA and on appeal to federal court.
Arizona
Theodore C. JarviAttorney at Law1050 E. Southern Ave., Suite G-3Tempe, AZ 85282Phone: (480) 838-6566

Fax: (480) 838-8810

web: http://www.jarvilaw.com

VA Accreditation: YES NOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Practice limited to representing America’s veterans and their families.
Arkansas
Michael SmithAttorney at Law425 W Capitol Av. Suite 3700Little Rock, AR 72201Phone: 501-519-4357

mail. [email protected]

web site. www.Arkansaslawhelp.com

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Representing veterans benefits appeals as well as plaintiff personal injury, medical malpractice, and insurance claims.
California
Monroe Thomas ClewisLaw Office of Monroe Thomas Clewis1055 E. Colorado Blvd., Ste 500Pasadena, Ca. 91106Phone: (626) 405-0731

fax (626) 405-0933

email [email protected]

web site www.goldenyearslaw.com

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Representing life planning for the elderly, as well as veterans Aid and Attendance and veterans benefits appeals.
Katrina J. Eagle Attorney at Law The Law Office of Wildhaber & Associates, PLLC 1380 Monroe St., NW; #265 Washington, DC 20010. phone: (858) 549-1561 (San Diego, CA) phone: (202) 299-1070 (Washington, DC) email:website: wildhaberlaw.com VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Practice limited to representing America’s veterans and their families.
Mark R. Lippman Attorney at Law The Veterans Law Group 8070 La Jolla Shores Drive La Jolla, CA 92037 phone: (888) 811-0523 or (858) 456-5840 fax: (866) 931-7468 or (858) 456-5855 email: [email protected] website www.veteranslaw.com VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Practice limited to representing veterans at all administrative and court levels.
Jeanne Anne Steffin Attorney at Law
626 North Garfield Ave., uite A Alhambra, CA 91801-1448 phone: (626) 235-1173 fax toll free: (888) 536-7833 toll free phone: (800) 771-5187 email: [email protected] web site: www.staffin.com VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents medical malpractice and medical injury against the VA and other government agencies including injuries from medical treatment by a U.S. Government Facility under the Federal Torts Claims Act and the Military Claims Act.
Erin R. Steffin Attorney at Law 626 North Garfield Ave., uite A Alhambra, CA 91801-1448 phone: (626) 235-1173 fax toll free: (888) 536-7833 toll free phone: (800) 771-5187 email: [email protected] web site: www.staffin.com VA Accreditation: YES NOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents medical malpractice and medical injury against the VA and other government agencies including injuries from medical treatment by a U.S. Government Facility under the Federal Torts Claims Act and the Military Claims Act.
Colorado
Sean Kendall Attorney at Law P.O. Box N Boulder CO 80306 Phone: (303) 449-4773 Toll free: (877) 629-1712 Fax: (877) 277-2119 email: [email protected] 
web site: www.seankendalllaw.net VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Representing veterans and dependents before the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Board of Veterans’ Appeals and U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims.
Connecticut
Winona W. Zimberlin Attorney at Law Law Office of Winona W. Zimberlin
2 Congress Street Hartford, CT 06114 Phone: (860) 249-5291
Fax: (860) 247-4194 email: [email protected] web site: VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information:
District of Columbia
Barbara Burns Harris Attorney At Law Barbara Burns Harris, Esq., P.L.L.C.
611 Pennsylvania Ave., S.E., #215 Washington, DC 20003-4303 phone: (202) 370-6916 fax: (202) 742-5922
email: [email protected] website:
VA Accreditation: YES NOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Practice includes representation cases in DC courts.
Sean Kendall Attorney at Law 601 Pennslyvania Ave. NW Suite 900, South Building Washington, DC 20004 Toll free: (877) 629-1712 Fax: (202) 318-1448 email:[email protected] web site: seankendalllaw.net VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Representing veterans and dependents before the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Board of Veterans’ Appeals and U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims.
Florida
Wade R. BosleyAttorney at LawLehigh Acres, FLPhone: 800-953-6224e-mail: [email protected]

website: www.lawyers4veterans.com

VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Serving America’s Veterans.
John W. CampbellAttorney at Law277 55th AvenueSt. Pete Beach, FL 33706phone: (727) 363-6146

fax: (727) 363-6146

email: [email protected] web site

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA member: YESAdmitted to CAVC: YESRepresents at all levels: YESOther information: Practice limited to Veterans and Dependents.
Leo DoughertyAccredited Claims Agent9361 Scepter AvenueBrooksville, FL 34613phone: (352) 200-6232

fax:

email: [email protected] web site:

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA member: YESAdmitted to CAVC: NORepresents at all levels: NO, Represents RO and BVA claims only.Other information: Accredited Representative
Brian D. Hill Attorney at Law Hill and Ponton, P.A. 444 Seabreeze Blvd, Suite 235; PO Box 2630 Daytona Beach, FL 32118 phone: (386) 257-2100 fax: (386) 239 0978 email: [email protected] web site: http://www.hillandponton.com/ VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Representing veterans and dependents. Practice includes representation of Social Security disability claimants before the SSA.
Matthew D. Hill Attorney at Law Hill and Ponton, P.A. 605 E. Robinson Ave, Suite 250 Orlando, FL 32802 phone: (407) 422-4665
fax: (407) 843-5247 email: [email protected] web site: http://www.hillandponton.com/ VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Representing veterans and dependents. Practice includes representation of Social Security disability claimants before the SSA.
Lisa A. Lee Attorney at Law Lee Law Firm 30-13 A1A North, Suite 158 Ponte Vedra Beach, FL32082 phone: (904) 223-1974 fax: (904) 223-3208 email: [email protected] web site: VA Accreditation: YES NOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Law Practice limited to representing Veterans and Dependents.
Carol J. Ponton Attorney at Law Hill and Ponton, P.A. 444 Seabreeze Blvd, Suite 235; PO Box 2630 Daytona Beach, FL 32118
phone: (386) 257-2100 fax: (386) 239 0978 email: [email protected] web site: http://www.hillandponton.com/ VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Representing veterans and dependents. Practice includes representation of Social Security disability claimants before the SSA.
Kim SyfrettAttorney at LawDisability Law Firm of Syfrett & Furr25 W. Oak AvenuePanama City, FL 32401

Ph. (850) 526-4443

Fax (850) 526-4499

email: [email protected]

web site: www.fightingforthedisabled.com

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Practice includes representation of Social Security disability claimants.
Cecilia WeldVeterans Disability Legal AssistantDisabilityLaw Firm of Syfrett & Furr25 W. Oak AvenuePanama City, FL 32401

Ph. (850) 526-4443

Fax (850) 526-4499

email: [email protected]

web site: www.fightingforthedisabled.com

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Practice includes representation of Social Security disability claimants.
Georgia
Victoria Collier Attorney at Law The Elder and Disability Law Firm of Victoria Collier, P.C.160 Clairemont Ave., Suite 440 Decatur, GA 30030
Phone: (404) 370-0696 Fax: email: [email protected] web site: www.elderlawgeorgia.com VA Accreditation: YESNOVA member: YESAdmitted to CAVC: YESRepresents at all levels: YESOther information: Practice focuses on Elder law, veterans, and disability cases (including Social Security).
Drew N. Early Attorney at Law 2845 Henderson Mill Rd. Atlanta, GA 30341 Phone: (770) 939-1939
Fax: (770) 939-0583 email: [email protected] VA Accreditation: YESNOVA member: YESAdmitted to CAVC: YESRepresents at all other levels: YESOther information: Practice focuses on Elder law (including wills, trusts, and estates), veterans, and guardianships/conservatorships.
David Pollan Attorney at Law The Pollan Law Firm 1801 Peachtree Street, Suite 150 Atlanta, GA 30309 Ph: (678) 510-1358 Fax: (678) 510-1362 email: [email protected] Website: www.pollanlawfirm.com VA Accreditation: YESNOVA member: YESAdmitted to CAVC: YESRepresents at all other levels: YESOther information:
Hawaii
Delia L’HeureuxAttorney at LawLawyers for Equal JusticeP.O. Box 37952Honolulu, HI 96837

phone: (808)587-7605

email: [email protected]

website: www.lejhawaii.org

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA member: YESAdmitted to CAVC: NORepresents at all levels: NO,Represents RO and BVA claims only.
Illinois
Gregory Chandler Attorney at Law Gregory Chandler & Associates 27 North Wacker Drive, # 903 Chicago, IL 60606-2800 Telephone: 800-793-6362 fax: email: [email protected]web site: VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information:
Steven C. Perlis Attorney at Law Steven C. Perlis & Associates, P.C. 3345 N. Arlington Heights Road, Suite DArlington Heights, IL 60004 phone: (847) 818-1138 fax: (847) 818-1128 email: [email protected] web site: www.perliselderlaw.com VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Practice includes representation of elder law cases.
Steven C. Perlis Attorney at Law Steven C. Perlis & Associates, P.C.203 N. LaSalle Street Chicago, IL 60601 phone: (312) 836-1138 fax: (847) 818-1128 email: [email protected] web site: www.perliselderlaw.com VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Practice includes representation of elder law cases.
Indiana
Wade R. BosleyAttorney at LawBosley, McKown & Bratch1320 Johnson Street,P.O. Box 1223

Marion, IN 46952

phone: 1-800-953-6224

fax: (765) 662-1156

email: [email protected]

web site: www.lawyers4veterans.com

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Serving America’s Veterans.
Ralph J. BratchAttorney at LawBosley, McKown & Bratch1320 Johnson Street,P.O. Box 1223

Marion, IN 46952

phone: 1-800-953-6224

fax: (765) 662-1156

email: [email protected]

web site: www.lawyers4veterans.com

VA Accreditation: YES NOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Serving America’s Veterans.
Jim KellerAttorney at LawKeller & Keller,Attorneys2850 N. Meridian St.

Indianapolis, IN 46208

phone: (317) 926-1111

fax: (317) 926-1411

email: [email protected]

web site: www.2keller.com

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Serving America’s Veterans.
Massachusetts
Patricia M. Dunn Attorney at Law Law Office of Patricia M. Dunn 19 Center Street, Suite 7 Weymouth, Massachusetts 02189-1304 phone: (781) 337-1778 fax: (781) 337-1778 email: [email protected] web site: VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Wills, Elder Law, and Medically Related Cases.
Michigan
Judy J. Donegan Attorney at Law Lawyers for Veterans Claims, P.L.L.C. 37887 W. Twelve Mile Road, Suite A Farmington Hills, MI 48331 phone: (866) 636-4914 (toll free phone/fax) fax: (866) 636-4914 (toll free phone/fax) email: [email protected] web site: www.lawyersforveteransclaims.com VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information
Miles J. Murphy III Attorney at Law Plachta, Murphy & Associates, P.C. 124 East Fulton, Suite 100 Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503 Phone: (616) 458-3994 Fax: (616) 458-2410 email: [email protected]/ web site: www.pmalawpc.com” VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: NO Admitted to CAVC: NO Represents at all levels: Disability Claims & Appeals, and VA Aid & Attendance Benefits Other Information: Member of the National Organization of Social Security Claimants’ Representatives (NOSSCR).
Michael R. Viterna Attorney at Law Law Office of Michael R. Viterna, P.L.L.C.9014 Chambord Drive Ypsilanti, MI 48197 
phone: (800) 971-4109 fax: (800) 971-4113 email: [email protected] website: http://www.icle.org/Modules/Directories/Contributors/bio.aspx?Pnumber=P44992 VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Practice concentrates in VA appeals.
Minnesota
Dennis L. Peterson Attorney at Law Peterson & Fishman P.L.L.P. 3009 Holmes Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55408 phone: (612) 827-8123 fax: email: [email protected] web site: www.petersonfishman.com VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: Offices in Minneapolis and Phoenix.
Missouri
Monte Phillips Attorney at Law Monte Phillips, L.L.C. 128 Washington Street Doniphan, MO 63935 Toll Free: 1-877-966-4968 phone: (673) 996-3838
fax: (673) 996-3838 cell: (673) 660-0660 email: [email protected] website: www.socialsecuritydisabilityclaims.net VA Accreditation: YES NOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information: We represent Social Security and Veterans Disability Claimants and TSGLI claimants only.
Montana
Robert M. KampferAttorney at LawP.O. Box 1946Great Falls, MT 59403phone: (406)727-9540

fax: (406) 453-5901

email: [email protected]

web site:

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YES Admitted to CAVC: YES Represents at all levels: YES Other Information:
New Jersey
Lewis C. Fichera Attorney at Law
773 W. Atlantic Avenue
Sewell, NJ 08080-1502
phone: (856) 468-3000
fax: (856) 468-3089
email: [email protected]
web site: www.lewisfichera.com VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Represents veterans before agency and federal court. Practice also includes Social Security disability appeals to agency and federal court.
Karl A. Kazmierczak Attorney at Law
Kazmierczak & Kazmierczak
593 Ramapo Valley Road
Oakland, NJ 07436
Toll Free (888) 527-5529
Fax: (201) 337-7137
email: [email protected]
web site: www.KazmierczakLaw.com VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Helping disabled persons receive Veterans Disability, Social Security Disability and Long Term Disability.
New Mexico
Patricia GlazekAttorney at LawP O Box 447Santa Fe, NM 87504tel: (505) 982-3164

fax: (505) 983-2885

email: [email protected]

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YESAdmitted to CAVC: YESReps at all levels: YESOther info: Represents veterans and dependants. Practice includes Social Security disability insurance and SSI disability claims and appeals.
New York
Karl A. Kazmierczak
Attorney at Law
Kazmierczak & Kazmierczak
One Penn Plaza
250 West 34th Street
New York, New York 10119
Toll Free (888) 527-5529
Fax: (201) 337-7137
email: [email protected]
web site: www.KazmierczakLaw.com VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Helping disabled persons receive Veterans Disability, Social Security Disability and Long Term Disability.
Nancy Y. Morgan
Attorney at Law
Finkelstein and PARTNERS
1279 Route 300
P.O. Box 1111
Newburgh, NY 12551 
Phone: (845) 563-9587 
Fax: 
Toll Free 1-800-634-1212
email: [email protected] VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information:
North Carolina
Paul M. Goodson and George Piemonte Attorneys at Law 
Law Offices of Goodson & Piemonte, P.C,
1300 Baxter St. , Ste. 425
Charlotte, NC
Toll free: 866-624-8781
Phone: 704-331-8014 
fax: 
web site: www.pgoodson.com VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Veteran’s Benefits, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, & Social Security Disability.
Paul M. Goodson and George Piemonte Attorneys at Law 
Law Offices of Goodson & Piemonte, P.C,
3101 Guess Road , Suite F-106
Durham NC 
Toll free: 866-624-8781
Phone: 919-471-5000
fax: 
web site: www.pgoodson.com VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Veteran’s Benefits, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, & Social Security Disability.
Paul M. Goodson and George Piemonte Attorneys at Law 
Law Offices of Goodson & Piemonte, P.C,
2018 Ft. Bragg Rd., Ste 108A
Fayetteville, NC
Toll free: 866-624-8781
Phone: 910-987-9576
Fax: 
web site: www.pgoodson.com VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Veteran’s Benefits, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, & Social Security Disability.
Paul M. Goodson and George Piemonte Attorneys at Law 
Law Offices of Goodson & Piemonte, P.C,
8601 Six Forks Rd., Suite 400
Raleigh, NC
Toll free: 866-624-8781
Phone: 919-834-6360
Fax: 
web site: www.pgoodson.com/ VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Veteran’s Benefits, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, & Social Security Disability.
Michael A. Leonard Attorney at Law
P.O. Box 15085
Wilmington, NC 28408
Toll free: (877) 657-5803
Fax: (910) 452-5234
email: [email protected]
web site: www.VETS-LAW.com VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Former VA Deputy Assistant General Counsel with Practice Dedicated Exclusively to Representing Veterans and Dependents.
Elizabeth Lunn Attorney at Law
Lunn & Forro, PLLC
186-200 Wind Chime Court
Raleigh NC 27615
phone: 919-844-6439
Toll Free: 888-966-6566
Fax: 919-844-7956 NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Veteran’s Benefits, Personal Injury, WorkerÕs Compensation, Unemployment, & Social Security Disability.
Ohio
Barbara CookAttorney at Law917 Main St., Suite 300Cincinnati, OH 45202phone: (513) 751-4010

toll-free: (800) 934-5059

fax: (513) 977-4221

email: [email protected]

web site:

VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information:
Pennsylvania
Michele Mansmann Attorney at Law
220 West Venango Street
Mercer, PA 16317
Phone 888-862-6762
Fax 877-352-8613
email: [email protected] website www.MansmannLaw.com VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Representing the disabled and injured in claims for Social Security Disability, Veterans Disability Compensation, Workers Compensation. Handling Claims in PA, NY, OH and WV
South Carolina
Rebecca C. Patrick Attorney at Law
PO Box 6763
Columbia, SC 29206
Phone: (803) 743-9043
Fax: 
email: [email protected] 
web site: VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information:
Tennessee
Amelia CrotwellMcDonald Levy Civil Justice Attorneys10805 Kingston Pike, Suite 200Knoxville, TN 37934Phone: (865) 966-7665

Fax: (865) 966-3519

email: [email protected]

VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Member of National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. I handle VA benefits, elder law, Medicaid, & social security.
Texas
Jill MitchellAttorney at LawHeard & Smith, LLP3737 Broadway, Suite 310San Antonio, TX 78209

Phone: (210) 820-3737, (800) 584-3700

Fax (210) 820-3777

email: [email protected]

web site: www.fight4veteransrights.com

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA Member: YESAdmitted to CAVC: YESRepresents at all levels: YESother information: Practice limited to representing veterans and their dependents.
Virginia
Marshall O. Potter
Attorney at Law
912 Cottage Street
Vienna, VA 22180
phone: (703) 938-3220
fax: (703) 938-3680
email: [email protected]
web site: VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Practice limited exclusively to Veterans Law. Former Board of Veterans Appeals Counsel. 25 years experience.
Sandra Wischow
Attorney at Law
Goodman, Allen & Filetti
P. O. Box 29910
Richmond, VA 23242
phone: 1-877-838-1010/1-804-346-5206
Fax: 804-346-5954
email: [email protected]
web site: www.vet1010.com VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Practice limited to representing veterans and their families at all administrative and court levels.
Washington
Paul C. BurtonAttorney at LawP.O. Box 101Issaquah, WA 98027phone: (425) 502-7284

email: [email protected]

web site: www.burtonlawllc.com

VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information:
Christopher LyonsAttorney at LawTruitt and Lyons640 E. Whidbey Ave.Oak Harbor, WA 98277

phone: (360) 675-9310

fax: (360) 679-9698

email: [email protected]

web site: www.truittandlyons.com

VA Accreditation: YESNOVA MEMBER: YESAdmitted to CAVC: YESRepresents at all levels: YESOther information: I also represent claimants in Social Security Disability cases including appeals to federal court.
Mary Anne RoyleAttorney at Law7700 NE 26th AvenueVancouver, WA 98665phone: 360-993-0364 or 888-570-0364

Fax: 360-993-5757

email: [email protected]

web site: www.roylelaw.com

VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information:
West Virginia
Richard Paul Cohen
Attorney at Law
Cohen, Abate & Cohen, L.C.
114 High Street, P.O. Box 846
Morgantown, WV 26507
phone: (304) 292-1911
fax: (304) 292-9575
email: [email protected] 
web site: www.wvajustice.com VA Accreditation: YES
NOVA Member: YES
Admitted to CAVC: YES
Represents at all levels: YES
Other Information: Represents Social Security, Workers Compensation, and Federal Disability cases; Represents Consumer Law.
Michael MiskowiecyAttorney at LawPO Box 2951PCharleston, WV 25330Phone: 1-800-573-3946

Fax: (304)342-3826

email: [email protected]

web site: www.miskowieclawoffice.com